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Two Foods That May Sabotage Your Brain

mental health brainBy Kelly Brogan, M.D.

Could two of the most popular foods consumed in the West be a major cause of psychiatric disorders?

Could there be a food-based cure for schizophrenia, bipolar, and depressive disorders? It is my firm conviction that diet – both what it may be deficient in as well as its potential toxicity – can cause what we label as mental illness. In medical school, we learn about the mental repercussions of nutrient deficiencies such as Beriberi (thiamin), Pellagra (niacin), and B12-deficiency induced dementia. We know that minerals such as magnesium and zinc are critical cofactors for basic functions, and that fatty acids are essential in the support of cell membrane health.

I believe in a partnership with my patients; however, my most paternalistic mandate, as a psychiatrist, is that of a gluten and casein free dietary trial.

What’s that? they often ask.

Gluten, from the Latin, “glue” is a composite of proteins comprised of gliadin and glutenin, found in wheat, with similar ‘glutinous’ proteins known as prolamines found in related grains such as rye (secalin), corn (zein), and barley (horedin), and casein is the name for a family of proteins in mammalian milk.  How does this relate to the average patient scheduling an appointment with a psychiatrist? Is it possible that our modern, post-industrial foods – sugar, gluten, processed dairy, and genetically modified soy and corn are conspiring with nutrient deficiencies in an incendiary collaboration that will give rise to gut/brain pathology?

Gut-Brain Axis

If we accept an inflammatory model of mental illness as having the strongest prospects for guiding preventive medicine interventions and non-toxic, reparative treatment approaches, then we must look at underlying drivers of inflammation.

Immune activating and inflammatory proteins, such as those found in wheat and dairy products, may be critical triggers to consider. One of the mostly highly processed foods in our diet –  wheat – is almost exclusively rendered as high-glycemic flour, prepared with sugar, and often genetically modified vegetable oils which are oxidized (rancid). Dairy is homogenized and pasteurized, creating a dead, high-sugar liquid with distorted fats, denatured proteins and unabsorbable or thoroughly destroyed vitamins.

Cross-reactivity and stimulation of antibody response by foods like dairy, oats, corn, millet was examined in this study, suggesting that there is important overlap between grains and dairy. Why and how would these foods cause the problems that they do? There are a number of identified reasons for the disturbances caused by America’s darling duo, cheese and bread:

  • Fire in the Hole

Lectins in grains and nightshade plants, and proteins in dairy and gluten – namely casein, gliadin and glutenin – can trigger intestinal changes, local, and systemic inflammation. Only recently have we begun to understand how and why. In the case of gluten, zonulin-mediated permeability affords gut contents, including bacterial toxins, access to the bloodstream, where they can play a significant role in driving inflammation and associated psychiatric symptoms, as discussed here.

  • Bugging the Bugs

It turns out that diet can be a major determinant of what bugs are most active in our guts, and that the bacteria in our guts may also determine the degree to which we are sensitive to local inflammatory effects of gluten. Gut bacteria are the gatekeepers sounding the alarm by sending inflammatory messages to the rest of the body including the brain.

  • Molecular mimicry

When the immune system reacts to a perceived threat such as a food protein, antibodies formed in response may also bind to tissue in glands and organs that share overlapping amino acid sequences. Antibodies can be formed against brain cells, specifically, at times with permanent resultant damage. A study of 400 volunteers found that half of those who reacted to wheat also reacted to brain-based peptides, and the same was found in the subgroup reacting to dairy, suggesting a clustering of reactivity to both brain tissue and these foods.

  • The Pleasure of Pizza

Digested proteins from cow dairy and gluten, termed exorphins, interact with opiate receptors in the brain, which accounts for the potentially addictive quality of these foods, and the associated withdrawal when they are taken off the menu.

What does the evidence suggest?

Research into the etiology or cause of syndromes centers around two primary outcomes of interest – associative data that suggests a relationship between an exposure and a cluster of symptoms (% of people with gluten sensitivity who have psychiatric problems), and treatment data that suggests a causative role for that exposure based on the therapeutic effects of its removal (cutting out dairy leads to treatment of depression).

Suspect # 1: Gluten

Assessment of psychiatric pathology in celiac patients has supported a statistically significant incidence of anxiety (panic), depression (21% in this study), bipolar patients, and schizophrenia (27% in this study).[1] When we consider the available evidence base, we have to zoom out to appreciate its inherent limitations – antibody-mediated immune response is just one mechanism by which the body can be alerted to a perceived threat. If you ask to be screened for gluten intolerance, that screening will typically include antibodies to only alpha gliadin, endomesial antibody, and one type of tissue transglutaminase. This testing neglects the role of the innate immune system in non-celiac gluten enteropathy, an inflammatory disorder that often has extra-intestinal manifestations. According to gluten-researcher, Dr. Hadjivassiliou, “gluten sensitivity can be primarily, and at times, exclusively, a neurological disease”.

Since 1953, there have been observations linking schizophrenia and Celiac disease, suggesting that the role of the immune system plays prominently in this poorly understood disorder.

A recent study contributes to the literature suggesting a bidrectional relationship between schizophrenia and autoimmune diseases. In this Danish cohort, individuals with schizophrenia and infectious exposures (hospitalization), the incidence of autoimmune disease was almost 3x as frequent.

The role of antibody complexes feature prominently in the work of Severance et al. who have explored gluten and casein in mental illness, primarily in a cohort of recent onset schizophrenics, non-recent onset schizophrenics, and non-psychiatric controls. In this study, they use complement fixation as an indication of immune reactivity to food/immune complexes that disrupt cellular functioning, demonstrating that those with immune reactions were 4.36 times more likely to be chronic schizophrenics. There is speculation as to the significance of in utero exposure to these foods, and how this may lead to changes to brain modeling, also supported by this study which found a 70% increase in adult schizophrenia in those who had gliadin antibodies at birth.

Even more compelling is the following case presentation:

“a 33-year-old patient, with pre-existing diagnosis of ‘schizophrenic’ disorder, came to our observation for severe diarrhoea and weight loss. A gluten-free diet was started, resulting in a disappearance of psychiatric symptoms, and normalization of histological duodenal findings and of SPECT pattern.”

This means that someone avoided a lifetime of medication with antipsychotics by eliminating gluten from their diet.

In a related report, a case series of three patients treated for depressive syndromes without active intestinal complaints experienced resolution of symptoms on a gluten free diet within 2-3 months, including one patient who was medicated during pregnancy and was able to stop medication within 2 months of dietary change

But I don’t have Celiac!

When I suggest elimination of gluten to patients, they sometimes tell me that they have already been tested, and “don’t have Celiac”. The limitations of currently available conventional testing are very real as most physicians who do a “Celiac panel” are only testing for alpha gliadin, tissue transglutaminase 2, and endomesial antibody, a small portion of the potential immune responses to this food. In a grain consisting of 6 sets of chromosomes, capable of producing greater than 23,000 proteins, this testing may just be too small a window into a very complex space. In one study, inflammatory response was noted in healthy volunteers, suggesting that gluten may cause reactions in everyone.

Suspect # 2 Dairy

The molecular similarity between gluten and casein makes them coconspirators. With quantitatively less literature; however, dairy immune provocation appears to be more variable from person to person. In cow dairy, there are 6 types of protein milk – 4 casein comprising 80% and 2 whey. Within the casein category, A1-beta casein is most commonly present in American cows (Holstein) and is thought to represent a mutated form of the protein, only 5,000 years old. Casomorphin, an opiate-stimulating compound, is released from A1-beta casein. A2-beta casein is found in the milk of sheep, goats, and Jersey cows.

Severence et al. have also identified elevated antibodies to alpha, kappa, and whole casein in new onset and treated schizophrenic patients, stating:

The elevated IgG and unique patterns of antibody specificity to bovine casein among diagnostic groups provide a rationale for clinical trials to evaluate efficacies of dietary modifications in individuals with neuropsychiatric diseases.”

In patients with casein antibodies, there was a 7-8x increase in the diagnosis of schizophrenia, and they have similarly demonstrated a 3-5x increased risk of Bipolar disorder in patients with casein antibodies (IgG), stating:

“anti-casein IgG associations with bipolar I diagnoses, psychotic symptom history, and mania severity scores suggest that casein-related immune activation may relate to the psychosis and mania components of this mood disorder.”

Beyond direct brain stimulation and poor digestion with local inflammation, cow dairy may also be a source of folate antibodies which can gum up receptors responsible for transporting this critical nutrient to the brain. This study established a linear relationship between these antibodies and exposure to milk – demonstrating resolution of antibodies on a milk-free diet and return with reintroduction of milk.

Gluten and casein free diets have been systematically studied in the autistic population, including in randomized trials; however, no such study design could account for the potential high yield outcomes in any given individual. For this reason, I recommend an empirical trial of at least one month in all individuals struggling with psychiatric symptoms. There are many wonderful and freely available guides to converting to a gluten free life, but the basic principle is to eliminate rye, barley, wheat, and unspecified oats.  The difficulty is in identifying the hidden sources of gluten in sauces, condiments, soups, and flavorings.  Essentially, going gluten-free should mean eliminating processed food from your life, which is why I have a low threshold to also recommend elimination of co-reactive foods like dairy (casein), corn, soy, and in some cases legumes (including peanuts), and gluten free grains like rice and millet. Dairy elimination would include all milk-based foods and products including yogurt, cheese, and ice cream. Think of these changes as a prescription for brain healing and for bringing your wellness onto a higher plane.

Learn more by visiting the GreenMedInfo databases on Wheat and Cow’s Milk proteins.

Originally posted: https://wakeup-world.com/2019/04/12/two-foods-that-may-sabotage-your-brain-2/

Study: Don’t Go Gluten-Free If You Don’t Have Celiac Disease

glutenAre you eating a gluten-free diet, but you don’t have celiac disease? A new study suggests that you may not want to make that move. Not only does a gluten-free diet not prevent heart disease, but researchers say avoiding gluten when you don’t have celiac disease could lead to cardiovascular disease and more.

According to the study, people without celiac disease who go gluten-free could wind up with serious health problems, because a gluten-free diet is associated with lower consumption of whole grains, which are associated with a lower risk of heart disease. [1]

Read: “Maybe it’s not the Gluten,” Study Says to the Public

Researchers write in The BMJ that “the promotion of gluten-free diets among people without celiac disease should not be encouraged.”

For people with gluten sensitivity – those who don’t have celiac disease, but have abdominal pain and other problems when they eat gluten – it still makes sense to restrict gluten intake.

However, Dr. Andrew T. Chan, an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School in Boston, says:

“It is important to make sure that this [gluten restriction] is balanced with the intake of non-gluten containing whole grains, since these are associated with a lower risk of heart disease.”

Wheat, rye, and barley are all sources of gluten. When people with celiac disease eat foods containing gluten, it triggers an immune reaction that damages the lining of the small intestine. Based on that knowledge, many people who don’t have celiac disease adopt a gluten-free diet, assuming that it is a healthier lifestyle choice.

Says Chan:

“The popularity of a low gluten or gluten-free diet in the general population has markedly increased in recent years.

However these findings underscore the potential that people who severely restrict gluten intake may also significantly limit their intake of whole grains, which may actually be associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes.

The promotion of gluten-free diets among people without celiac disease should not be encouraged.” [2]

Read: Eating Whole Grains Could Extend Your Life

For the study, researchers looked at data from nearly 120,000 health professionals over the age of 26. The participants periodically answered questions over a 26-year period concerning the types of food they ate. Based on participants’ answers, the Harvard team estimated how much gluten each individual consumed in his or her diet.

The researchers also gathered data on whether participants suffered a heart attack during the study, which was considered a proxy for the development of coronary artery disease. [1]

The scientists, upon dividing the participants in to 5 groups based on the amount of gluten they ate, discovered that those in the group that ate the most gluten were no less likely to have a heart attack than those in the group that ate the least gluten.

At first glance, the data appeared to show that gluten intake was associated with a lower risk of heart attack. But the lower risk wasn’t due to gluten consumption itself. Instead, it was linked with the consumption of whole grains associated with gluten intake.

Source: Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

The team wrote:

“These findings do not support the promotion of a gluten-restricted diet with a goal of reducing coronary heart disease risk.”

The news gets worse. The researchers also found that eating only small amounts of gluten, or not eating it at all, increased the risk of diabetes by 13%. Another “Debbie Downer” finding was that people who ate the least gluten were 15% more likely to suffer from coronary heart disease compared with those who ate the most. [2]

The researchers concluded that “promotion of gluten-free diets for the purpose of coronary heart disease prevention among asymptomatic people without celiac disease should not be recommended.” [3]

Sources:

[1] LiveScience

[2] The Telegraph

[3] The Sun

Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Source: http://naturalsociety.com/study-gluten-free-no-celiac-disease-1119/

Five ingredients that poison your brain

3d-Model-Human-Brain-Skeleton-PainThere is no shortage of things driving us crazy in the world today, but there are some things that could do it in a shorter amount of time. These gut disturbing, liver compromising, and brain damaging ingredients have come from the “infinite genius” of man, and have clearly ruined our ability to think clearly.

Avoid these 5 ingredients scrupulously, and watch your brain function improve:

Gluten

Gluten is a common protein molecule found in wheat, barley, rye, kamut, and spelt. This sticky protein binds to the small intestinal wall where it can cause digestive and immune system disorders. Celiac disease is the most common condition associated with gluten sensitivity. However, there is also a condition termed non-celiac, gluten sensitivity (NCGS), and it is a major factor in the inflammatory disorders of the brain and nervous system.

Studies have shown many associations between gluten sensitivity and disorders in every part of the neurological system including the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nerves. Gluten has been shown to be a big trigger in psychiatric disorders, cognitive impairment, dementia, and virtually every other neurological disorder.

Artificial Sweeteners

Whether it is aspartame (or AminoSweet), sucralose (Splenda), or saccharin (Equal, Sweet ‘N Low), artificial sweeteners so popular due to their zero calorie marketing, have been poisoning brains for decades. Aspartame is a combination of chemicals, namely aspartic acid (an amino acid with excitatory effects on brain cells), methanol, and phenylalanine, and when broken down produces a compound that is a powerful brain-tumor-causing chemical.

Aspartame consumption causes a variety of symptoms including anxiety attacks, slurred speech, depression, and migraines. It and other artificial sweeteners can be found in sodas, yogurt, chewing gum, cooking sauces, tabletop sweeteners, flavored water, cereal, and sugar free products.

Monosodium glutamate (MSG)

MSG is a form of concentrated salt added to foods to enhance flavor. It tricks the taste buds and the brain into thinking food tastes delicious, but as an excitotoxin, it triggers the brain to produce excess quantities of the feel-good drug, dopamine. Unfortunately, the good feelings don’t last, but the side effects do. Excitotoxins have been linked to brain damage and other neurological diseases including Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, dementia, MS, lupus, and more.

Be on the look out for MSG in any processed products, including “healthy” snacks, salad dressing, barbecue sauce, bouillon cubes, and canned soups and vegetables.

Refined Sugar

Refined sugar has become one of the most prolific ingredients in our food, and one of the most dangerous. Its constant consumption has been linked to many different health problems, all which have a negative effect on the brain.

Refined sugar consumption suppresses brain-derived neurotrophic factor, or BDNF, a very important growth hormone for the brain. This factor triggers new connections between neurons in the brain that are vital for memory function. Studies have shown low BDNF levels in patients with depression and schizophrenia, and the consumption of sugar could exacerbate those conditions by further contributing to those low levels.

Refined sugar also increases inflammation, which can disrupt the digestive and immune systems. If this inflammation is chronic, it can lead to a higher risk of depression and schizophrenia. Dr. Ilardi, associate professor of psychology at University of Kansas, encourages depressed patients to remove refined sugar from their diets, and those who were willing to comply reported significant improvements in mental clarity and mood.

Fluoride

The decision to add fluoride to public drinking water has had perhaps one of the most dangerous and widespread effects on our overall health, most notably the brain.

The Fluoride Action Network (FAN) reported a study that found fluoride was linked to lower IQ, even at ranges added to U.S. water supplies. One study sponsored by UNICEF found that IQ was reduced at just 0.88 mg/l of fluoride, a level that is added to U.S. drinking water systems and considered within the optimal range.

FAN also stated that 34 studies now link fluoride to lower IQ levels in humans, while other studies link it to learning and memory impairment, fetal brain damage, and altered neurobehavioral function.

These 5 ingredients can be relatively easy to avoid, with the right motivation and knowledge. However, some of them can be tricky. To learn more about MSG and the dozens of other names it can go under, read What is MSG? Side Effects Explained and see this article for brain health (check out the brain tonic recipe). To find out how to choose a water solution that is free of fluoride, check out this Guide To Drinking Water. See the first source below for more on brain health.

Sources:

http://www.organiclifestylemagazine.com

http://www.organiclifestylemagazine.com

http://www.healingthebody.ca

http://www.organiclifestylemagazine.com

http://www.organiclifestylemagazine.com

http://www.healingthebody.ca

http://www.healingthebody.ca

http://www.naturalnews.com

Author: Derek Henry
Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/049315_brain_health_poisonous_ingredients_chemicals.html#ixzz46MqQgpNN

What medications have you been able to stop on the Wheat Belly lifestyle?

I posed this question on the Wheat Belly Facebook page recently and received an overwhelming response. Here, I share a partial list of the responses: medications people have been able to stop by following the Wheat Belly lifestyle.
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Just take a look at this incredible list: these represent medications prescribed by doctors to, in effect, “treat” the consequences of consuming wheat and grains. They prescribe drugs to treat the inflammation, swelling, skin rashes, gastrointestinal irritation, high blood sugars, airway allergy, and other abnormal effects all caused by wheat and grains.

The list includes anti-inflammatory and pain medication, acid reflux drugs, injectable and oral drugs for diabetes, numerous anti-hypertensive agents, asthma inhalers and allergy drugs, drugs for migraine headaches, and others. It is truly an astounding list that represents drugs that were unnecessary, costly, and filled with side-effects, both acute and long-term. It is a fascinating reflection of how this lifestyle works to restore the human body back to its pre-grain state and thereby reverses so many modern health conditions.

Stomach acid blocking drugs:
Prevacid
ranitidine
Prilosec
Zantac
Protonix
Nexium
Gaviscon

Diabetes drugs:
metformin
Lantus, Novalog, regular insulin
Victoza
Amaryl
Farxiga
Januvia

Blood pressure drugs:
lisinopril
Atacand
Altace
losartan
labetalol
hydrochlorothiazide
diltiazem
methyldopa
atenolol
Diovan
Coreg
Lasix

Allergy medications:
Benadryl
Claritin
Allegra
Zyrtec
Dymista nasal spray
Tavist
prednisone

Asthma drugs:
Advair
albuterol
Singulair
Ventolin inhaler
Pulmicort inhaler

Anti-inflammatory and pain meds:
Neurontin
Baclofen
ibuprofen
Cymbalta
naproxen
Gabapentin
Tramadol
aspirin
Advil

Migraine headaches drugs:
Fioricet
Axert

Immune system suppressing drugs:
methotrexate
plaquenil
prednisone
Enbrel

Cholesterol reducing drugs:
Lipitor
pravachol
Crestor

Anti-anxiety, antidepressant, anti-psychotic medications:
Wellbutrin
Ativan
Diazepam
largactil
Zoloft
Klonopin

Others:
acyclovir
Miralax
Buscopan
Dostinex

Author: Dr. William Davis
 

 

How Gluten Destroys Thyroid Health

glutenI have already discussed my disdain for gluten in previous articles, citing numerous research studies reporting its negative effects on the brain and digestive health. Gluten is a very hard protein found in wheat, barley, and rye products, and most individuals today are sensitive — if not downright intolerant — to its structure. One topic frequently overlooked is the relationship between gluten consumption and thyroid disease. Although the connection between nutrition and thyroid health has been circulating in the medical and nutrition literature for years, it’s only recently that we’re seeing an increasing amount of scrutiny being placed on gluten’s effects on thyroid health.

The Problem with Gluten

Gluten contains gliadin, a protein that is foreign to the human body. The unfamiliarity leads to the initiation of an immune response, an action that is amplified in individuals with Celiac disease. Many people today are sensitive or intolerant to gluten, and an immune response is not just excluded to those with Celiac. Depending on the intensity of the immune response, an individual may notice little effect; for intolerant individuals, profound symptoms may present themselves immediately.

Through the years, wheat has been extensively cultivated and gluten has become much harder to digest. The wheat of our ancestors resemble nothing of what it is today, as evidenced by the ever-increasing cases of Celiac disease in the last 50 years. Individuals merely sensitive to gluten may experience symptoms that seem unrelated to wheat consumption. These symptoms include hormonal imbalance, skin issues, brain fog, fatigue, depression, arthritis, and migraines. Many of these annoying symptoms remain prevalent in the lives of many people today simply because it’s difficult to connect these symptoms to eating gluten-containing products.

Gluten and Thyroid Health: What’s the Connection?

To the body, gliadin looks very similar to transglutaminase, an enzyme needed to form chemical bonds throughout the human body. [1] While present in many organs, the thyroid possesses a higher concentration of this enzyme. When the immune system attacks gliadin, the antibodies also attack the thyroid. [2] As the immune response continues, the thyroid suffers damage for up to 6 months after gluten consumption.

Not only can digestive health suffer when people with Celiac disease or intolerance/sensitivity participate in prolonged gluten consumption, but thyroid health also drastically degrades. An inactive or underproductive thyroid can interfere with proper hormone synthesis and metabolism, and it can also affect weight and energy.

Thyroid Disease and Gluten Intolerance

Researchers have determined those with an autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD), especially Hashimoto’s (hypothyroidism) or Grave’s (hyperthyroidism) disease, should be regularly screened for Celiac disease and gluten intolerance. [3] [4] A significant focus of research to date has examined the incidences of gluten intolerance in patients with ATD. Many patients with ATD do show an immune response to gluten, indicating a need to introduce nutritional approaches for individuals with chronic and debilitating autoimmune disorders.

Does Gluten Only Affect the Thyroid?

When gluten stimulates an immune response, other areas of the body can also be affected, such as the brain. Research has also found that patients with ATD suffer immune attacks on the endocrine system, the main system responsible for managing hormones. [5] In patients with Celiac disease, gluten is a known to be a prime trigger for endocrine disorders. [6]

Gluten and Hormonal Imbalance: The Hidden Link Behind Common Health Concerns

Any chemical, whether it be natural or synthetic, that interferes with thyroid and endocrine function creates an imbalance within the entire human body. That’s because these organs control hormone production, and malfunctioning hormones can interfere with metabolism, fertility, and mood. Even cardiovascular health is related to proper hormone function, making it crucial that you employ various health strategies (like avoiding gluten) to keep hormones in check. In this light, gluten may be contributing to many of our most common health problems in a much more significant way than previously considered.

One Final Thought

If you have an autoimmune thyroid disorder, it is imperative that you completely avoid gluten. For those who suffer from a gluten sensitivity, avoiding gluten may be the best choice to protect your thyroid and overall health. Many people who have chosen a gluten-free lifestyle either by need or by choice report incredible and even dramatic improvements in their health. The best answer for all of us may be a gluten-free lifestyle, especially if we are seeking to balance hormone levels. Instead of wheat, choose gluten-free whole grains like quinoa, buckwheat, and millet.

-Dr. Edward F. Group III, DC, ND, DACBN, DCBCN, DABFM

References:

  1. Griffin M1, Casadio R, Bergamini CM. Transglutaminases: nature’s biological glues. Biochem J. 2002 Dec 1;368(Pt 2):377-96.
  2. Naiyer AJ1, Shah J, Hernandez L, Kim SY, Ciaccio EJ, Cheng J, Manavalan S, Bhagat G, Green PH. Tissue transglutaminase antibodies in individuals with celiac disease bind to thyroid follicles and extracellular matrix and may contribute to thyroid dysfunction. Thyroid. 2008 Nov;18(11):1171-8. doi: 10.1089/thy.2008.0110.
  3. Hakanen M1, Luotola K, Salmi J, Laippala P, Kaukinen K, Collin P. Clinical and subclinical autoimmune thyroid disease in adult celiac disease. Dig Dis Sci. 2001 Dec;46(12):2631-5.
  4. Sategna-Guidetti C1, Bruno M, Mazza E, Carlino A, Predebon S, Tagliabue M, Brossa C.. Autoimmune thyroid diseases and coeliac disease. Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 1998 Nov;10(11):927-31.
  5. Akay MN1, Akay G. The presence of the antigliadin antibodies in autoimmune thyroid diseases. Hepatogastroenterology. 2003 Dec;50 Suppl 2:cclxxix-cclxxx.
  6. Kumar V1, Rajadhyaksha M, Wortsman J. Celiac disease-associated autoimmune endocrinopathies. Clin Diagn Lab Immunol. 2001 Jul;8(4):678-85.

Source:http://www.globalhealingcenter.com/natural-health/how-gluten-destroys-thyroid-health/?utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=Facebook_glutenthyroid

Scientists Say New GMO Wheat Silences DNA and Can Cause Fatalities in Children

GMO-wheat-dangerAustralian researchers have revealed serious issues over a new kind of genetically engineered wheat that could induce major health threats for people that consume it.

University of Canterbury Professor Jack Heinemann announced the outcomes of his genetic study into the wheat, a kind engineered by Australia’s Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), at a conference last month.

Recently, Australian researchers claimed to have developed a form of salt-tolerant wheat that would allow farmers to grow crops in soil with high salinity.

Heinemann discovered that the molecules developed in this wheat, intended to silence wheat genes, can match human genes. With consumption, these molecules can enter the human body and potentially silence our genes, he explained. “The findings are absolutely assured. There is no doubt that these matches exist.”

Flinders University Professor Judy Carman and Safe Food Foundation (SFF) Director Scott Kinnear accepted Heinemann’s analysis.

Just last year, scientists from Rothamsted Research, based in Hertfordshire, used biotechnological tools to genetically engineer a wheat plantthat produced high levels of an aphid repelling odour.

That strain of wheat would not require treatment with insecticide because it would repel colonisation by the aphid pests and also attract natural predators. Critics charged that there are natural symbioses that take place between aphids and crops which are essential to their survival and the initiative to repel colonisation is another direct attack on much larger ecosystems.

“These scientists are very short-sighted and they aren’t looking at the whole picture and consequences of introducing GM wheat. There are many bacterial symbioses that take place between aphids and other microorganisms that will affect their entire ecosystem should an intolerant species be introduced into the food chain,” said microbiologist Joseph Sagarese.

“If this silences the same gene in us that it silences in the wheat — well, children who are born with this enzyme not working tend to die by the age of about five,” stated Professor Carman.

Based on the research, long-term testing must be performed before the wheat is offered to grocery retailers.

“We firmly believe that long term chronic toxicological feeding studies are required in addition to the detailed requests made by Heinemann for the DNA sequences used,” Kinnear stated.

“The industry routinely does feeding studies anyway, so it should not be too much more difficult to do long term (lifetime) studies and include inhalation studies,” Heinemann added. “These should be tuned to the way people would be exposed to the product.”

The researchers also cautioned consumers against eating the wheat if it is approved prematurely. “I would advise citizens to request that these tests be done and the evidence meet with their standards of scientific rigour if in the end it is approved for use,” said Heinemann.

If the concerns surrounding CSIRO’s GM wheat are not resolved, the issue could end up in court, according to Kinnear: “If CSIRO was to consider moving towards human feeding trials without conducting these studies, we would be looking at what legal avenues are available to stop them.”

Approximately 700 million tons of wheat are now cultivated worldwide making it the second most-produced grain after maize. It is grown on more land area than any other commerical crop and is considered a staple food for humans.

In July 2009 Monsanto announced new research into GM wheat, and industry groups kicked their promotion of GM wheat into high gear. “Widespread farmer and consumer resistance defeated GM wheat in 2004 and this global rejection remains strong, as demonstrated by today’s statement,” said Lucy Sharratt, Coordinator of the Canadian Biotechnology Action Network.

View the press conference held last month on the threat of CSIRO’s GM wheat.

Sources:
preventdisease.com
digitaljournal.com
reuters.com

About the author:

Natasha Longo has a master’s degree in nutrition and is a certified fitness and nutritional counselor. She has consulted on public health policy and procurement in Canada, Australia, Spain, Ireland, England and Germany.

This article was reposted with the express permission of the kind crew at preventdisease.com

Ancient solution to a modern wheat problem? Einkorn may provide a new grain alternative for those suffering from gluten intolerance

tumblr_m412h8TOEc1r62x3iOver the last several years, many who value health are becoming aware of the dangers of gluten, especially when it’s consumed as modern wheat. Severe digestive distress, celiac disease, rheumatoid arthritis, ADHD, multiple sclerosis and even mental illnesses such as schizophrenia are just a few of the maladies linked to the protein in wheat, barley and rye. As reactions continue to escalate at a staggering rate in the United States, both researchers and private organizations are beginning to take a look at ancient cereal grains as a possible solution to our wheat troubles.

Commonly known as einkorn, Triticum monococcum is an intriguing heritage grain that was harvested as early as 16,000 BCE. Cultivation began during the Neolithic Era and early Bronze Age (10,000-4,000 BCE) and continued into the early 20th century, when much of einkorn production was replaced by hybridized, high-yield, pest-resistant strains of what we now recognize as modern wheat.

Einkorn is nutritionally superior to hard red wheat, supplying higher levels of protein, fat, phosphorous, potassium, pyridoxine and beta-carotene. It’s also much lower in problematic gluten. Enthusiasts of einkorn believe it tastes better, lending a “light rich taste which left common bread wheat products tasteless and insipid by comparison,” according to the ASHS publication Progress in New Crops. What’s really garnering attention, however, is that einkorn may be nontoxic to individuals suffering from gluten intolerance.

Safe for celiacs?

Several studies indicate that einkorn could provide a new grain option for the millions with celiac disease and gluten sensitivity. In one experiment, intestinal biopsies were taken from 12 treated celiac patients, as well as 17 control subjects, and cultured with either standard bread gliadin or einkorn gliadin for 24 hours. At the end of the testing, researchers concluded, “[This study shows] a lack of toxicity of T. monococcum gliadin in an in vitro organ culture system, suggesting new dietary opportunities for celiac patients.”

Another study involved 12 celiac patients who had been adhering to a gluten-free diet for at least one year. In a single-blind, cross-over investigation, each participant was given einkorn wheat, rice or amygluten on days 0, 14 and 28. At the end of the study, researchers noted that, although “[n]o definite conclusion can be drawn on the safety of Tm [einkorn]. . . Tm was, however, well tolerated by all patients providing the rationale for further investigation on the safety of this cereal for CD patients.”

Additionally, Norwegian researchers have identified a T-cell stimulatory gluten peptide in modern wheat which triggers an autoimmune response in people sensitive to the protein. Alpha-gliadin genes on wheat chromosome 6D appear to be the culprit. Of particular interest to individuals with celiac disease is that einkorn wheat does not contain this troublesome peptide. Further research is needed, but preliminary findings hold promise for those suffering from gluten reactions.

Sources:

http://www.hort.purdue.edu

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

http://informahealthcare.com

http://www.celiac.com

http://www.psmag.com

http://www.wakingtimes.com

http://science.naturalnews.com

Source: Natural News -About the author:
Carolanne enthusiastically believes if we want to see change in the world, we need to be the change. As a nutritionist, natural foods chef and wellness coach, Carolanne has encouraged others to embrace a healthy lifestyle of organic living, gratefulness and joyful orientation for over 13 years. Through her website www.Thrive-Living.net she looks forward to connecting with other like-minded people who share a similar vision.

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