Select Page

The corona-driven Technocrat coup d’etat is at risk of collapse as masses of people around the world are rejecting the notion of mandated vaccines. In England, 65% will reject the upcoming vaccine but, surprisingly, younger citizens were twice as likely to reject. ⁃ Technocracy News & Trends Editor Patrick Wood

By Laura O’Callaghan – Express UK

A recent survey by King’s College London and Ipsos MORI showed only 53 percent of the UK population are “very likely” to get the COVID-19 vaccine, once it’s on the market. Younger voters were twice as likely to oppose the vaccine in the poll of 2,237 people aged between 16 and 75. To gauge readers’ views on the topical issue, Express.co.uk conducted an exclusive poll asking: “Should Britons be forced to have the coronavirus jab once it is developed?”

Sixty-five percent (2,906) of respondents said no, with many saying they would have to be dragged kicking and screaming to have the vaccine administered.

Thirty-four percent (1,617) said a compulsory vaccine programme should be rolled out across the UK, one of Europe’s hardest-hit countries since the beginning of the pandemic.

One percent (60) said they didn’t know.

One reader said they would not feel safe having a coronavirus vaccine injected into their body because they simply cannot trust pharma giants.

They said: “No vaccine, whose manufacturer demands an indemnification, can be trusted.”

A second person said any attempts to force a vaccine on Britons as the country returns to the new normal would cross a dangerous line in the sand.

They said: “Forced vaccinations will mark the transition of Britain from a representative democracy into a totalitarian technocracy.”

Read full story here…

Sourced from Technocracy News & Trends

Patrick Wood is a leading and critical expert on Sustainable Development, Green Economy, Agenda 21, 2030 Agenda and historic Technocracy. He is the author of Technocracy Rising: The Trojan Horse of Global Transformation (2015) and co-author of Trilaterals Over Washington, Volumes I and II (1978-1980) with the late Antony C. Sutton.